Post Tagged with: "Education"

on January 27, 2015 at 3:17 PM / in Georgia

Lessons from Louisiana in Education

By Nathan Williams Georgia can learn something from a fellow Deep South state when it comes to raising the bar for education. In recent years, many Georgia public schools have experienced academic failure, been embarrassed by administrative scandals, and found themselves in financial ruin. They are in desperate need of a solution. The model crafted in Louisiana to address underperforming […]

Read more ›
on December 27, 2014 at 1:03 AM / in National, University

The Education Factory: How the U.S. Education System is Killing Creativity

by: Faiz Saulat Enjoy learning and want to go to a “good” school? Just maintain at least a 3.6 GPA to be competitive in classes; sacrifice sleep throughout the semester, but especially during exam week to study; strive to outrank most of your classmates; participate in a wide variety of extracurricular activities because such involvement is the only way to […]

Read more ›
on November 12, 2014 at 10:48 PM / in National

The Ripple Effect — Why the Affordable Care Act is the First Step to a Privatized Tomorrow

By: Connor Quirk  The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare, was signed into law on March 23, 2010.  It represents the most significant regulatory overhaul of the U.S. healthcare system since the passage of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965.  However, long-term effects of the shake-up are not self-contained within the healthcare industry.  If Obamacare ultimately proves […]

Read more ›
on June 3, 2014 at 7:56 AM / in World

Brazil: Love It, Leave It, or Change It

By: Chris Lewitzke Over the past 12 months, Brazil’s golden image of sunny beaches, beautiful people, and a prospering economy has faded away. Now, news stories mention Brazil in the context of protests, missed building deadlines, and slowed economic growth. For many Americans, these stories are their first exposure to the intricate and difficult problems that have faced Brazil for decades: economic “booms” […]

Read more ›
on April 16, 2014 at 4:07 PM / in World

Brazil: Love It, Leave It, or Change It

By: Chris Lewitzke Over the past 12 months, Brazil’s golden image of sunny beaches, beautiful people, and a prospering economy has faded away. Now, news stories mention Brazil in the context of protests, missed building deadlines, and slowed economic growth. For many Americans, these stories are their first exposure to the intricate and difficult problems that have faced Brazil for […]

Read more ›
on February 26, 2014 at 10:31 PM / in Arts & Culture

Lessons from Figure Skating on Quantifying Quality

By: Alex Edquist Another round of controversy over figure skating judging erupted these past Olympics when Russia’s Adelina Sotnikova upset heavily-favored reigning champion Yuna Kim of South Korea in the women’s free skate. “I just couldn’t see how Yuna and Sotnikova were so close in the components,” said Kurt Browning, a four-time figure skating world champion and prominent commentator on […]

Read more ›
on February 21, 2014 at 5:00 PM / in Georgia

The Red Election: The Republican Governor’s Race

By: Cait Felt As the 2014 Georgia gubernatorial race heats up, the individual platforms of candidates are becoming increasingly important to voters around the state. Many of us know a bit more about current Gov. Nathan Deal and State Sen. Jason Carter, but there are two other men vying for the Republican candidacy and the chance to run in the […]

Read more ›
on February 18, 2014 at 2:16 PM / in Interviews

Q&A with Andrew Dill, UGA Director of Federal Relations

By: Shalin Jyotishi From football fans reminiscing on the glory days of Vince Dooley, to ambitious high school students (and their parents) aiming for admittance into UGA’s honors program, the Georgia “brand” has a fairly strong foothold in the Southeast. However, as the university grows and its ambitions grow from encompassing not just state and regional concerns, but also national […]

Read more ›
on February 15, 2014 at 9:28 PM / in National

Pre-K is A-OK

By: Andrew Roberts Like Mark Twain said, “Every time you close a school, you will have to build a jail. What you gain at one end you lose at the other. It’s like feeding a dog on his own tail. It won’t fatten the dog.” The case for education reform is a simple one to make—GDP growth, worker productivity, non-pecuniary […]

Read more ›
on February 13, 2014 at 2:22 AM / in University

The Birthplace of Public Higher Education

By: Mark Rush Bring out the cake, party hats, and balloons! Our dear UGA celebrated its birthday this past week. At 229 years old, the Bulldog Nation can be justifiably proud of its university’s legacy and timeworn traditions. However, this occasion has another special meaning: the founding of UGA signifies the birth of state-funded higher education in the United States. […]

Read more ›
""