• Source: Flickr

    Impeach Who?

    By: Mark Rush When prominent satirist Stephen Colbert mockingly announced his support for President Obama’s impeachment the story that originated with Sarah Palin officially became a major headline. Palin’s initial push to impeach the president occurred with her opinion piece published on July 8, 2014 and has become a frenzy since. A recent poll showed that a third of Americans […]

  • Displaced Yazidis, persecuted by ISIS, flee their homes.

    Looking for a Lead

    By: Matt Oldham On July 17, 2014 the world witnessed the newest chapter in aerial terrorism. This was not an airliner that exploded over a city or slammed into a building; it was was an attack on a 298 passenger commercial airline en route from Amsterdam to Malaysia that claimed the lives of all the men, women, and children on […]

  • Michelle Nunn (left) and David Perdue (right) will be running against each other in the 2014 Senate midterm elections.
(Source: CNN Political Ticker)

    An Extraordinary Election Cycle: An Update on Georgia

    By: Jon Wilson As 36 states have been choosing their candidates for this year’s U.S. Senate and state gubernatorial elections, Georgia’s races are proving to be the most unique the state has seen in years. Unlike recent election cycles in the Peach State, this year’s two major elections feature big names for both Democrats and Republicans alike. In both races, three of […]

  • Above are marshes off of Cumberland Island, which is one of Georgia's 14 barrier islands. They have been protected from development since the island was named a national seashore in 1972.  (Photo credit: John Lilly, flickr.com)

    A Threat Against Georgia’s Coast

    By: Cecilia Moore Georgia’s Environmental Protection Division (EPD) issued a memorandum this past April that dramatically altered how Georgia’s 1975 Erosion and Sedimentation Act (E&S Act) is implemented. This Act has mandated a 25-foot buffer of vegetation between construction projects and Georgia’s state waters for nearly 40 years. However, the EPD’s April directive made it so that the buffer could […]

  • Started from the Bottom

    Started from the Bottom

    by: Aashka Dave and Kathleen Wilson Globalization is your “American-made” car that, though assembled in the United States , contains parts from India, China, Thailand, and many other countries. It is your trip through the grocery store aisle: the roses are from Columbia, the orange juice from Florida, and the Haribo gummy bears from Germany. Thanks to globalization, you can […]

  • The Defining Challenge of Our Time

    The Defining Challenge of Our Time

    By: Alex Edquist and Chris Neill When did economic inequality become such a hot-button issue? Pope Francis made headlines in November when he railed against economic inequality, asking, “How can it be that it is not a news item when an elderly homeless person dies of exposure, but it is news when the stock market loses two points?” President Obama […]

  • Majoring in Eligibility: How NCAA Policy is Harming the Student-Athlete

    Majoring in Eligibility: How NCAA Policy is Harming the Student-Athlete

    By: Chris Lewitzke  In 2014, over 600,000 fans will pack into Sanford Stadium to watch dozens of 18 to 23-year-olds play a football game. These so-called “student-athletes” will generate the majority of the $100 million the UGA Athletic Association expects in revenue for fiscal year 2014. Across the country, college football and basketball programs generate billions of dollars for collegiate […]

  • Is the Venetian Republic the Ultimate Sunk Cost?

    Is the Venetian Republic the Ultimate Sunk Cost?

    By: Marco Roca In the popular imagination, Venice has become inseparably intertwined with images of winding waterwa ys and resplendent byzantine a nd gothic architecture. Even the name “Venice” has an aristocratic resonance to it—and for good reason, considering its rich history and widely regarded reputation as one of the most beautiful cities in the world. Unfortunately, the “Queen of the […]

  • In Order to Form a More Perfect University

    In Order to Form a More Perfect University

    By: Uzma Chowdhury   Out of 34,000 students at The University of Georgia, only 3,604 voted in last year’s Student Government Association elections. In other words, a little more than 10 percent of the UGA student body voted in the University’s current executive board and senators. The previous year had a higher voter turnout – 14 percent – but even […]

  • The Ice That Drove Old Dixie Down

    The Ice That Drove Old Dixie Down

    By: Chet Martin “Never make a mistake they can take a picture of” was the cardinal rule of William Hartsfield, Atlanta’s famous former mayor. Governor Nathan Deal and Mayor Kasim Reed made mistakes that spawned Internet slide shows. The week of Jan. 29—Snowmageddon, South Parked, Snowjam ’14, take your pick—made Atlanta a global laughingstock and a symbol of Dixie’s incompetence […]

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