• Sam Nunn, the Armed Services Committee, and Georgia’s Senate Race

    Sam Nunn, the Armed Services Committee, and Georgia’s Senate Race

    By: Max Wallace The 2014 Georgia Senate race is about as riveting as electoral politics can get. Incumbents enjoy a re-election rate that exceeds 90 percent, so Senator Chambliss’s retirement has presented a rare opportunity for America’s elite to climb the Capitol Hill career ladder without having to worry about dealing with a current office holder.  The allure of an […]

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    Brazil: Love It, Leave It, or Change It

    By: Chris Lewitzke Over the past 12 months, Brazil’s golden image of sunny beaches, beautiful people, and a prospering economy has faded away. Now, news stories mention Brazil in the context of protests, missed building deadlines, and slowed economic growth. For many Americans, these stories are their first exposure to the intricate and difficult problems that have faced Brazil for […]

  • Strange Bedfellows: Is the United Kingdom Too Close to Russia to Impose Sanctions?

    Strange Bedfellows: Is the United Kingdom Too Close to Russia to Impose Sanctions?

    By: Eli Scott “We need to be willing to harm ourselves to harm Russia. We’re long past the point where Western financial centers should be enabling Russian kleptocrats. But that’s undoubtedly what’s happening.” The above statement came from Andrew Foxall, a director of Russian studies at the Henry Jackson Society in reference to the United Kingdom’s unwillingness to impose harsh […]

  • The Game of Sticks and Carrots: A North Korean Story

    The Game of Sticks and Carrots: A North Korean Story

    By: Katie Crow On March 28, President Park, the president of South Korea, went to Dresden, Germany, where she received an honorary doctorate degree in law. During her acceptance speech, she delivered a three-point plan to North Korea. The plan was designed to encourage co-prosperity, cooperation, and even eventual hopes of potential reunification as South Koreans and North Koreans “recover […]

  • (Un)reality Television

    (Un)reality Television

    By: Chenee Tracey “You’re going to Hollywood!” Cut to the excited “American Idol” contestant who has just discovered she has advanced to the next round. She hasn’t even performed in front of the judges. Instead, the show’s producers decided she could advance to the next level. Reality shows are designed to be entertaining. Cameramen follow reality television subjects with hopes […]

  • The European Union, Netflix, and Net Neutrality

    The European Union, Netflix, and Net Neutrality

    By: Bruce Li On April 3, 2014, the European Union voted in favor of measures that would promote equal access to the Internet by preventing Internet providers from charging for “preferential access” to their networks. The EU was lauded by net neutrality advocates for its effort to progressively shape Internet policy for the future. Meanwhile in the United States, the […]

  • Treating the Cause, Not the Symptoms: How Property Rights Can Help Solve the Organ Crisis

    Treating the Cause, Not the Symptoms: How Property Rights Can Help Solve the Organ Crisis

    By: Michael Land Sharon Brennan suffered from cystic fibrosis and received a double lung transplant at the age of 32. Though her transplant was successful, she tells the story of many friends who were not as lucky: “While I was on the transplant list, so many young people with [cystic fibrosis] whom I’d got to know through social media died […]

  • Kashmir’s picturesque scenery belies its role as the object of nuclear-tipped, nationalist anger. (Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons)

    The Zero Line of Kashmir

    By: Michael Ingram A tourist attraction in the middle of a warzone is a peculiar sight to behold. I stood, dressed in my Sunday best, flanked by a cadre of soldiers. Dark-lensed Aviator glasses guarded their watchful eyes, and all hands hovered unflinchingly over their hip-mounted pistols. Pictures were being snapped nonchalantly amid a decades-long deadlock between ideological adversaries. Across […]

  • Rwanda, 20 Years Later

    Rwanda, 20 Years Later

    By: Matthew Oldham   In the spring of 1994, the international community witnessed one of the most violent and horrific genocides ever orchestrated. In the tiny East African nation of Rwanda, ethnic conflict finally reached its dreadful crescendo in a 100-day massacre that resulted in the deaths of 800,000 men, women, and children. During the colonial era (1884-1961) the Hutu, […]

  • Citizens United 2.0

    Citizens United 2.0

    By: Patrick Wheat In another step toward the elimination of any sort of limits on financial contributions to political campaigns, the Supreme Court announced on Wednesday its decision in the case of McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission (FEC) by ruling that a cap on personal financial contributions toward a political entity is a violation of First Amendment rights. What this […]

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