• My Land is Your Land

    My Land is Your Land

    By: Samantha Cleare Thousands of undocumented children have entered the United States; thousands continue to cross the border, unaccompanied. Dealing with this conflict of politics and ethics, President Barack Obama tackles one of his final adversities in office. What caused this recent influx of escaping child refugees? A recent increase in gang and drug-related violence not in Mexico, but in Honduras, […]

  • The Arrival of a Second Hegemon

    The Arrival of a Second Hegemon

    By: William Robinson Since the end of the 19th century, no nation has challenged U.S. supremacy over the Americas. The United States’ position as the hegemon of the Western Hemisphere was won with an expansionist policy. By conquering, purchasing, and annexing territories, the United States amassed the potential to become a hegemon, but it did not truly earn the title […]

  • Wickedness in the Land of Righteousness: The Zionist Conundrum

    Wickedness in the Land of Righteousness: The Zionist Conundrum

    By: Alex Boylston When one thinks of the State of Israel, one of its many nicknames that comes to mind is “the Jewish state.” This makes sense as it was established through a series of handovers and UN legislation as a homeland for the Jewish people. These Jews had been in exile for nearly 3,000 years and many yearned for […]

  • The Haze of War: A review of David Ayers’ “Fury”

    The Haze of War: A review of David Ayers’ “Fury”

    By: Rob Oldham Many times, I walk out of a war film feeling patriotic, proud, and certain that American soldiers are bona fide badasses. Of course I feel this way because that is what a film is designed to do. Everything from the pulse thumping score to the smeared makeup on the actors’ faces is intended to generate emotional reactions […]

  • Who Said Congress Should Set Wages?

    Who Said Congress Should Set Wages?

    By: Austin McCandlish   The GOP won big this past election. Beginning January of next year, Republicans will control both houses of Congress, leaving many Democrats clinging to hopes of a 2016 comeback. But Republicans were not the only ones cheering after the polls closed on Tuesday night. Four states, all of them red, just passed ballot measures to increase […]

  • The Good, the Bad, and the Shady

    The Good, the Bad, and the Shady

    By: Garrett Masters What we see isn’t all that is there. The Internet is an ocean of endless information, and most people are unaware of the illegal, billion dollar enterprise that exists below the surface. The surface Web, which everyone routinely uses, contains a mere 0.03 percent of the information that is available on the World Wide Web. The other 99.97 […]

  • When Cancer Screening Goes Too Far: Implications of Medical Overdiagnosis

    When Cancer Screening Goes Too Far: Implications of Medical Overdiagnosis

    By: Hammad Khalid The new face of cancer is not cancer of the lung, breast, colon, or prostate. Instead, thyroid cancer is now the most common cancer in South Korea, after a fifteen-fold increase in incidence over the past two decades. Although thyroid cancer rates have more than doubled since 1994 in the United States, and similar upward trends can […]

  • U.S. President Barack Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu together outside of Air Force One

    The Sands of Change Toward Israel

    By: Bailey Palmer The relationship between the United States and Israel is peculiar, and given recent developments, quite childish. On Oct. 28, “The Atlantic” published an article titled “The Crisis in U.S.-Israel Relations Is Officially Here.” A bombastic exposé, it quoted U.S. officials complaining about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s intransigence behind closed doors. The attacks were decidedly personal. An […]

  • The Ripple Effect — Why the Affordable Care Act is the First Step to a Privatized Tomorrow

    The Ripple Effect — Why the Affordable Care Act is the First Step to a Privatized Tomorrow

    By: Connor Quirk  The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare, was signed into law on March 23, 2010.  It represents the most significant regulatory overhaul of the U.S. healthcare system since the passage of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965.  However, long-term effects of the shake-up are not self-contained within the healthcare industry.  If Obamacare ultimately proves […]

  • OPINION: When It’s Okay to Discriminate in the Airport

    OPINION: When It’s Okay to Discriminate in the Airport

    By: Alex Edquist The week after Georgia’s stunning football victory over Clemson, I got a text from my father. He had worn Georgia paraphernalia to the Atlanta airport, and one of the TSA officers had said “Go Dawgs” and then told him that he pulls aside Florida Gator fans for “random” pat downs. My first reaction was to laugh. My […]

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